Fernand Gobet

Fernand Gobet

Professor of Cognitive Psychology

A bit about Fernand Gobet

I earned my Ph.D. in psychology in 1992 at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland. After a six-year stay at Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh, USA, where I collaborated with Nobel Prize winner Herbert Simon, I was Senior Research Fellow and then Reader at the University of Nottingham. I moved to Brunel University in 2003 to take up a Chair in cognitive psychology. Since 2013, I have been Professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Liverpool.

My research interests include the psychology of expertise and talent, computational modelling and the acquisition of language. I’m the main architect behind the CHREST project (Chunk Hierarchy and REtrieval STructures), one of the few cognitive architectures in the world. Beyond perception, memory and decision making in a number of games (chess, Go, awele and blackjack), CHREST has simulated data on concept formation, implicit learning, memory for computer programs and problem gambling. Variants of CHREST have successfully accounted for key phenomena in the acquisition of syntactic structures (in collaboration with Daniel Freudenthal and Julian Pine, LuCiD) and the acquisition of vocabulary (in collaboration with Gary Jones, Nottingham Trent University, and Julian Pine, LuCiD).

I have over 250 scientific publications, including six books on expertise and computational modelling. My two latest books are Foundations of cognitive psychology (2011) and Problem gambling: Cognition, prevention and treatment (2014), and I’m currently finishing a book entitled Understanding expertise: An integration of psychology, neuroscience and sociology (2015). For more information please visit my CHREST profile page.

My Role in LuCiD

I will work on Work Package 12, on developing a model of word class acquisition that can simulate developmental changes in productivity across  languages,  and on the Language 0-5 Project.

 

LuCiD publications (9) by Fernand Gobet

Gobet, F. (2017). Entrenchment, Gestalt formation and chunking. In H.-J. Schmid (Ed.), Entrenchment, memory and automaticity. The psychology of linguistic knowledge and language learning (pp. 245-267). Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Freudenthal, D., Pine, J. M. & Gobet, F. (2016). Incorporating defaulting effects into MOSAIC: Building a two-factor model of the Optional Infinitive stage. Paper presented at the the 2nd LuCiD Language and Communicative Development Conference, Manchester, UK.

Kangatharan, J., Uther, M. & Gobet, F. (2016). Native and non native listeners’ speech comprehension performance under adverse listening conditions. Proceedings of New Sounds Conference. Aarhus, Denmark: New Sounds.

Lloyd-Kelly, M., Gobet, F., & Lane, P.C.R. (2016). Under pressure: How time-limited cognition explains statistical learning by 8-month old infants. Papafragou, A., Grodner, D., Mirman, D., & Trueswell, J.C. (Eds.). Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Freudenthal, D., Pine, J. M., Jones, G. & Gobet, F. (2016). Developmentally plausible learning of word categories from distributional statistics. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J. C. Trueswell, (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 674-679). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Freudenthal, D., Pine, J. M., Jones, G. & Gobet, F. (2016). Simulating Developmental Changes in Noun Richness through Performance-limited Distributional Analysis. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J. C. Trueswell, (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 602-607). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Lloyd-Kelly, M., Gobet, F. & Lane, P. (2015). Be-Bop-A-Lula: A CHREST model of infant word segmentation. Poster presented at the Fifth Implicit Learning Seminar, Lancaster University. Lancaster: UK.

Freudenthal, D., Pine, J. M., Jones, G. & Gobet, F. (2015). Defaulting effects contribute to the simulation of cross-linguistic differences in Optional Infinitive errors. In D. C. Noelle, R. Dale, A. S. Warlaumont, J. Yoshimi, T. Matlock, C. D. Jennings & P. P. Maglio (Eds.), Proceedings of the 37th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 746-751). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Freudenthal, D., Pine, J. M., Jones, G. & Gobet, F. (2015). Simulating the cross-linguistic pattern of Optional Infinitive errors in children's declaratives and Wh- questions. Cognition, 143, 61-76.

Search all Publications